Washington

Irving

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Found among the Papers of the Late Diedrich Knickerbocker

Die Legende von der Schlafhöhle

Übersetzt von Adolf Strodtmann
Synchronisation und Ergänzungen © Doppeltext 2012

TITELBLATT

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW

IMPRESSUM

A pleas­ing land of drowsy head it was,
Of dreams that wave be­fore the half-shut eye;

And of gay castles in the clouds that pass,
Forever flush­ing round a sum­mer sky.
CASTLE OF IN­DOL­ENCE.
In the bos­om of one of those spa­cious coves which in­dent the east­ern shore of the Hud­son,
at that broad ex­pan­sion of the river de­nom­in­ated by the an­cient Dutch nav­ig­at­ors the Tap­pan Zee, and where they al­ways prudently shortened sail
and im­plored the pro­tec­tion of St. Nich­olas when they crossed, there lies a small mar­ket town or rur­al port,
which by some is called Greens­burgh, but which is more gen­er­ally and prop­erly known by the name of Tarry Town.
This name was giv­en, we are told, in former days, by the good house­wives of the ad­ja­cent coun­try,
from the in­vet­er­ate propensity of their hus­bands to linger about the vil­lage tav­ern on mar­ket days.
Be that as it may, I do not vouch for the fact, but merely ad­vert to it, for the sake of be­ing pre­cise and au­then­t­ic.
Not far from this vil­lage, per­haps about two miles, there is a little val­ley
or rather lap of land among high hills, which is one of the quietest places in the whole world.
A small brook glides through it, with just mur­mur enough to lull one to re­pose;
and the oc­ca­sion­al whistle of a quail or tap­ping of a wood­peck­er is al­most the only sound that ever breaks in upon the uni­form tran­quil­lity.
I re­col­lect that, when a strip­ling, my first ex­ploit in squir­rel-shoot­ing
was in a grove of tall wal­nut-trees that shades one side of the val­ley.
I had wandered into it at noon­time, when all nature is pe­cu­li­arly quiet, and was startled by the roar of my own gun,
as it broke the Sab­bath still­ness around and was pro­longed and re­ver­ber­ated by the angry echoes.
If ever I should wish for a re­treat whith­er I might steal from the world and its dis­trac­tions, and dream quietly away the rem­nant of a troubled life,
I know of none more prom­ising than this little val­ley.
From the list­less re­pose of the place, and the pe­cu­li­ar char­ac­ter of its in­hab­it­ants,
who are des­cend­ants from the ori­gin­al Dutch set­tlers, this se­questered glen has long been known by the name of SLEEPY HOL­LOW,
and its rus­tic lads are called the Sleepy Hol­low Boys throughout all the neigh­bor­ing coun­try.
A drowsy, dreamy in­flu­ence seems to hang over the land, and to per­vade the very at­mo­sphere.
Some say that the place was be­witched by a High Ger­man doc­tor, dur­ing the early days of the set­tle­ment;
oth­ers, that an old In­di­an chief, the proph­et or wiz­ard of his tribe,
held his pow­wows there be­fore the coun­try was dis­covered by Mas­ter Hendrick Hud­son.
Cer­tain it is, the place still con­tin­ues un­der the sway of some witch­ing power,
that holds a spell over the minds of the good people, caus­ing them to walk in a con­tinu­al rev­er­ie.
They are giv­en to all kinds of mar­vel­lous be­liefs, are sub­ject to trances and vis­ions,
and fre­quently see strange sights, and hear mu­sic and voices in the air.
The whole neigh­bor­hood abounds with loc­al tales, haunted spots, and twi­light su­per­sti­tions;
stars shoot and met­eors glare of­ten­er across the val­ley than in any oth­er part of the coun­try,
and the night­mare, with her whole nine­fold, seems to make it the fa­vor­ite scene of her gam­bols.
The dom­in­ant spir­it, however, that haunts this en­chanted re­gion, and seems to be com­mand­er-in-chief of all the powers of the air, is the ap­par­i­tion of a fig­ure on horse­back, without a head.

Washington Irving
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow / Die Legende von der Schlafhöhle
Zweisprachige Ausgabe
Übersetzt von Adolf Strodtmann

Dies ist ein interaktives E-Book. Klicken Sie auf den Text, um die Übersetzung einzublenden.

Der Originaltext und die Übersetzung sind gemeinfrei. Die Rechte für die synchronisierte zweisprachige Ausgabe und für die von uns in der Übersetzung ergänzten Textpassagen liegen bei Doppeltext.

Unser Programm umfasst viele weitere zweisprachige Titel. Besuchen Sie www.doppeltext.com, um mehr zu erfahren.

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Meinung und Kritik.

Doppeltext
Igor Kogan & Tatiana Zelenska
Karwendelstr. 25
D-81369 München
Tel. +49-89-76 75 55 34
www.doppeltext.com
info@doppeltext.com