Edgar Allan

Poe

The Fall of the House of Usher

Der Untergang des Hauses Usher

Übersetzt von Gisela Etzel
Synchronisation und Ergänzungen © Doppeltext 2012

TITELBLATT

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER

IMPRESSUM

Son cœur est un luth sus­pendu;
Sitôt qu’on le touche il résonne.
De Béranger.
Dur­ing the whole of a dull, dark, and sound­less day in the au­tumn of the year,
when the clouds hung op­press­ively low in the heav­ens, I had been passing alone, on horse­back, through a sin­gu­larly dreary tract of coun­try,
and at length found my­self, as the shades of the even­ing drew on, with­in view of the mel­an­choly House of Ush­er.
I know not how it was — but, with the first glimpse of the build­ing, a sense of in­suf­fer­able gloom per­vaded my spir­it.
I say in­suf­fer­able; for the feel­ing was un­re­lieved by any of that half-pleas­ur­able, be­cause po­et­ic, sen­ti­ment,
with which the mind usu­ally re­ceives even the stern­est nat­ur­al im­ages of the des­ol­ate or ter­rible.
I looked upon the scene be­fore me — upon the mere house, and the simple land­scape fea­tures of the do­main — upon the bleak walls — upon the va­cant eye-like win­dows
— upon a few rank sedges — and upon a few white trunks of de­cayed trees — with an ut­ter de­pres­sion of soul
which I can com­pare to no earthly sen­sa­tion more prop­erly than to the after-dream of the rev­el­ler upon opi­um
— the bit­ter lapse into every-day life — the hideous drop­ping off of the veil.
There was an ici­ness, a sink­ing, a sick­en­ing of the heart — an un­re­deemed drear­i­ness of thought
which no goad­ing of the ima­gin­a­tion could tor­ture into aught of the sub­lime.
What was it — I paused to think — what was it that so un­nerved me in the con­tem­pla­tion of the House of Ush­er?
It was a mys­tery all in­sol­uble; nor could I grapple with the shad­owy fan­cies that crowded upon me as I pondered.
I was forced to fall back upon the un­sat­is­fact­ory con­clu­sion, that while, bey­ond doubt, there are com­bin­a­tions of very simple nat­ur­al ob­jects
which have the power of thus af­fect­ing us, still the ana­lys­is of this power lies among con­sid­er­a­tions bey­ond our depth.
It was pos­sible, I re­flec­ted, that a mere dif­fer­ent ar­range­ment of the par­tic­u­lars of the scene, of the de­tails of the pic­ture,
would be suf­fi­cient to modi­fy, or per­haps to an­ni­hil­ate its ca­pa­city for sor­row­ful im­pres­sion;
and, act­ing upon this idea, I reined my horse to the pre­cip­it­ous brink of a black and lur­id tarn
that lay in un­ruffled lustre by the dwell­ing, and gazed down
— but with a shud­der even more thrill­ing than be­fore — upon the re­mod­elled and in­ver­ted im­ages of the gray sedge,
and the ghastly tree-stems, and the va­cant and eye-like win­dows.

Edgar Allan Poe
The Fall of the House of Usher / Der Untergang des Hauses Usher
Zweisprachige Ausgabe
Übersetzt von Gisela Etzel

Dies ist ein interaktives E-Book. Klicken Sie auf den Text, um die Übersetzung einzublenden.

Der Originaltext und die Übersetzung sind gemeinfrei. Die Rechte für die synchronisierte zweisprachige Ausgabe und für die von uns in der Übersetzung ergänzten Textpassagen liegen bei Doppeltext.

Unser Programm umfasst viele weitere zweisprachige Titel. Besuchen Sie www.doppeltext.com, um mehr zu erfahren.

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Meinung und Kritik.

Doppeltext
Igor Kogan & Tatiana Zelenska
Karwendelstr. 25
D-81369 München
Tel. +49-89-76 75 55 34
www.doppeltext.com
info@doppeltext.com